Soul Supreme Huit Octobre 1971 / Raid Release

January 25, 2021

Soul Supreme Huit Octobre 1971 / Raid Release

"Each time I visited Soul Supreme at home, a stone’s throw away from where I live, a framed print of MF DOOM’s mask on top of his record shelf grabbed my attention. Staring down at us with a piercing and intimidating dark look. Madvillain-style. Last time I stopped by, in early January, that art print (illustrated by Dase Boogie about seven years ago) all of a sudden evoked something else.

The ‘Raid’ b/w ‘Huit Octobre 1971’ 45 record we were about to discuss was in the making since mid-October. But the news of MF DOOM’s passing at the turn of 2020, made it a bittersweet release to talk about. There we were, instead of just geeking out over the Madlib production, DOOM’s buttery flow, or the sampling of Bill Evans, George Clinton, and “América Latina,” we had another thing to talk about: the last act of Daniel Dumile’s 23 years of metal-faced hip-hop magic.

For Dumile, the post-Zev Love X alter ego and metal mask were ways to put people’s focus on the music, not the person behind it. To counter a trend in hip-hop of—in his words during Red Bull Music Academy 2011—”what things look like as opposed to what they sound like.” Hip-hop’s metal-faced anti-hero, born right on time to “end the reign of the jiggy MC.”

In his own way, Soul Supreme also cuts the ego when it comes to making music. “I'm not a speak-artist, I’m a musician,” he says. “I love how MF DOOM had attitude and character. There’s real emotion in his work, including his choice of samples. But at the same time, he puts music completely on the forefront by hiding his own identity. That’s what the mask also represents to me. It’s a note to self to only care about the music.”

While talking about the ‘Nardis’ sample in the intro of Madvillain’s ‘Raid,’ a famous Bill Evans quote comes to mind for him. ‘It goes: ‘Ultimately, I came to the conclusion that all I must do is take care of the music. Even if I do it in a closet. And if I really do that, somebody's going to come and open the door of the closet and say, 'Hey, we're looking for you.'’ That’s it. That’s Soul Supreme. Always putting keys over clout, and soul over ego. With MF DOOM’s mask still staring down on him, as present as ever."

- Danny Veekens
 

credits

releases February 12, 2021

Jamie Peet: Drums (Track 2)
Glenn Gaddum Jr.: Bass (Track 2)
Valentin Guenther: Trombone (Track 2)
Niklouds Holler: Saxophone (Tracks 2).
Soul Supreme: Fender Rhodes, Moog Sub37, Sequential OB6, percussion.

Track 1 written by A. Mion.
Track 2 written by O. Jackson, T. D. Dumile.

Produced and arranged by Soul Supreme
Recording engineer (Track 2): Ferdinand Rauchmann.
Mastering: Wouter Brandenburg.
Liner notes: Danny Veekens.
Design: Dase Boogie

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