Soul Supreme Huit October/Raid 7"

"Each time I visited Soul Supreme at home, a stone’s throw away from where I live, a framed print of MF DOOM’s mask on top of his record shelf grabbed my attention. Staring down at us with a piercing and intimidating dark look. Madvillain-style. Last time I stopped by, in early January, that art print (illustrated by Dase Boogie about seven years ago) all of a sudden evoked something else.

The ‘Raid’ b/w ‘Huit Octobre 1971’ 45 record we were about to discuss was in the making since mid-October. But the news of MF DOOM’s passing at the turn of 2020, made it a bittersweet release to talk about. There we were, instead of just geeking out over the Madlib production, DOOM’s buttery flow, or the sampling of Bill Evans, George Clinton, and “América Latina,” we had another thing to talk about: the last act of Daniel Dumile’s 23 years of metal-faced hip-hop magic.

For Dumile, the post-Zev Love X alter ego and metal mask were ways to put people’s focus on the music, not the person behind it. To counter a trend in hip-hop of—in his words during Red Bull Music Academy 2011—”what things look like as opposed to what they sound like.” Hip-hop’s metal-faced anti-hero, born right on time to “end the reign of the jiggy MC.”

In his own way, Soul Supreme also cuts the ego when it comes to making music. “I'm not a speak-artist, I’m a musician,” he says. “I love how MF DOOM had attitude and character. There’s real emotion in his work, including his choice of samples. But at the same time, he puts music completely on the forefront by hiding his own identity. That’s what the mask also represents to me. It’s a note to self to only care about the music.”

While talking about the ‘Nardis’ sample in the intro of Madvillain’s ‘Raid,’ a famous Bill Evans quote comes to mind for him. ‘It goes: ‘Ultimately, I came to the conclusion that all I must do is take care of the music. Even if I do it in a closet. And if I really do that, somebody's going to come and open the door of the closet and say, 'Hey, we're looking for you.'’ That’s it. That’s Soul Supreme. Always putting keys over clout, and soul over ego. With MF DOOM’s mask still staring down on him, as present as ever."

- Danny Veekens

Soul Supreme Huit October/Raid 7"

"Each time I visited Soul Supreme at home, a stone’s throw away from where I live, a framed print of MF DOOM’s mask on top of his record shelf grabbed my attention. Staring down at us with a piercing and intimidating dark look. Madvillain-style. Last time I stopped by, in early January, that art print (illustrated by Dase Boogie about seven years ago) all of a sudden evoked something else.

The ‘Raid’ b/w ‘Huit Octobre 1971’ 45 record we were about to discuss was in the making since mid-October. But the news of MF DOOM’s passing at the turn of 2020, made it a bittersweet release to talk about. There we were, instead of just geeking out over the Madlib production, DOOM’s buttery flow, or the sampling of Bill Evans, George Clinton, and “América Latina,” we had another thing to talk about: the last act of Daniel Dumile’s 23 years of metal-faced hip-hop magic.

For Dumile, the post-Zev Love X alter ego and metal mask were ways to put people’s focus on the music, not the person behind it. To counter a trend in hip-hop of—in his words during Red Bull Music Academy 2011—”what things look like as opposed to what they sound like.” Hip-hop’s metal-faced anti-hero, born right on time to “end the reign of the jiggy MC.”

In his own way, Soul Supreme also cuts the ego when it comes to making music. “I'm not a speak-artist, I’m a musician,” he says. “I love how MF DOOM had attitude and character. There’s real emotion in his work, including his choice of samples. But at the same time, he puts music completely on the forefront by hiding his own identity. That’s what the mask also represents to me. It’s a note to self to only care about the music.”

While talking about the ‘Nardis’ sample in the intro of Madvillain’s ‘Raid,’ a famous Bill Evans quote comes to mind for him. ‘It goes: ‘Ultimately, I came to the conclusion that all I must do is take care of the music. Even if I do it in a closet. And if I really do that, somebody's going to come and open the door of the closet and say, 'Hey, we're looking for you.'’ That’s it. That’s Soul Supreme. Always putting keys over clout, and soul over ego. With MF DOOM’s mask still staring down on him, as present as ever."

- Danny Veekens

Grading

Mint(M)

Record Grading Guide:

  • Mint (M) – Absolutely perfect in every way. Never been played and usually sealed.
  • Near Mint (NM) – The record has been on a shelf between other records. The vinyl looks glossy and clearly has only been played a few times. There are no marks on the vinyl and the whole package is complete.
  • Excellent (E) – Same but I’d tolerate very light marks where the vinyl has been in and out of the inner sleeve a few times, or tiny signs of use generally.
  • Very Good Plus (VG+) – A few further faults are acceptable, but nothing that really compromises the record visually or audibly. A little rub, light inaudible marks, a little background crackle.
  • Very Good (VG) – It’s seen a bit of life, but is still usable. Light pops and clicks, an edge split, light visible scratches. You can still listen to it and enjoy looking at it, but it is visually and audibly USED.
  • Good (G) – To be honest you’re making trouble for yourself here, as Good means Bad. I’d only be selling something really desirable in this condition, with a bargain price and a full, no holds barred description to match.
  • Poor (P), Fair (F) Attempting to listen will be a disturbing experience. Expect major noise issues, skipping or repeating. The record itself is cracked, badly warped and has deep scratches. The cover is also approaching death.

Sample

#RICHMEDINA45BAG



Related Items

Customer Reviews

No reviews yet
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)